Monthly Archives: December 2014

Ryan (animated short) by Chris Landreth and Ryan Larkin

Ryan (animated short) by Chris Landreth and Ryan Larkin

Ryan, directed by Chris Landreth, is an animated tribute to Canadian animator Ryan Larkin. Thirty years ago, at the National Film Board of Canada, Ryan produced some of the most influential animated films of his time. In Ryan we hear the voice of Ryan Larkin and people who have known him, but these voices speak through strange, twisted, broken and disembodied 3D generated characters… people whose appearances are bizarre, humorous or disturbing. Although incredibly realistic and detailed, Ryan was created and animated without the use of live action footage, rotoscoping or motion capture…but instead from an original, personal, hand animated three-dimensional world which Chris calls ‘psychological realism’.

OVATION TV, ART LIKE NEVER BEFORE. TV LIKE NOTHING ELSE. http://www.ovationtv.com

https://www.nfb.ca/film/ryan

Talking Heads / I Get Wild/Wild Gravity

Talking Heads / I Get Wild/Wild Gravity

Fooled around enough with numbers Let’s not be ourselves today Is it just my imagination? Is it just someones face?

Pleasantly out of proportion It’s hard to hold on to the ground Now I didn’t come to run And this is everything and gravity lets you down

I get wild, wizing up, I just can’t let go I get wild, when I get ready I can hardly talk Living lights, special lights yellow turns blue I get wild, it’s automatic and I can hardly move

Go ahead and pull the curtains Check to see if I’m still here Let me lose my perspective Something worth waiting for

Somewhere in South Carolina And gravity don’t mean a thing And all around the world, each and everyone Playing with a heart of steel

I get up, climbing out, how did I get home? I’ll survive the situation, somebody shut the door Beautiful, beautiful, climbing up the wall I get by on automatic, no surprise at all

No one here can recognize you Here is everything that you like Feelings without explanations Somethings are hard to describe

The sound of a cigarette burning A place there where everything spins And the sounds inside your mind is playing all the time Playing with a heart of steel

I get wild, wizing up, I just can’t let go I get wild, when I get ready I can hardly talk Living lights, special lights yellow turns blue I get wild, it’s automatic and I can hardly move

I get up, pushing up, how did I get home? I’ll survive the situation, somebody shut the door Shut the door, shut the door climbing up the wall I get by on automatic no surprise at all

Songwriters BYRNE, DAVID/WEYMOUTH, TINA/FRANTZ, CHRISTOPHER/HARRISON, JERRY

Read more: Talking Heads – I Get Wild / Wild Gravity Lyrics | MetroLyrics

The imagery of the words seem to play with the enterprise of the first moon shot, or steps into the space program: “Played around enough with numbers…” (the theories and research which led to the space program) “let’s not be ourselves today…” (let’s change what we are—earthbound) “is it just my imagination?” (is it possible?) “is it just someones face?” (is it vanity, this endeavor?) But the interpretation of this experience, the words used to describe this venture might also be applied to the experience of coming of age in general—applicable to the life of the individual and the society in this instance: “pleasantly out of proportion…” (from the child’s world to the adult. In this there is perhaps a starker indication that this new, adult, world involves sex. Oh and, moon shot… get it.) The feel of the music agrees with the notion of gravity, this is not something to be taken lightly. The idea of such a modern endeavor as space flight juxtaposed with the idea of coming of age, suggests that this version of coming of age is something new and modern as well. We are entering a bigger world than our parents did when they came of age. There is something of greater gravity in this new coming of age… like space travel, the stakes are high… “how did I get home?!” but so too are the potential rewards. This is a song of wary optimism, it is inviting, alluring, intriguing and dangerous—like sex. cfjurgus

The Muffs / Sad Tomorrow

The Muffs / Sad Tomorrow

I don’t even know why
Do you think I’m a mess
Maybe someday but now you’re gone
When I do as I please
I’m no different to me
Am I crazy or have good luck
You’re the talk of the town
So you say (oh, oh)
I don’t know why you’re so glad
When my head’s filled with sorrow
So maybe if I fade away
There’ll be no sad tomorrow
My whole life is a drag
Baby listen to me
When I go away, will you care
I feel naked and weird
Do you see what I hear
Maybe one day I’ll die, who cares
Hide away in complete
Misery (oh, oh)
I don’t know why you’re so glad
When my head’s filled with sorrow
So maybe if I fade away
There’ll be no sad tomorrow

Medieval Music posted on Youtube by Gramilla888

Medieval Music posted on Youtube with comment by Gramilla888

Chant (or plainsong) is a monophonic sacred form which represents the earliest known music of the Christian church.

Chant developed separately in several European centres. Although the most important were Rome, Hispania, Gaul, Milan, and Ireland, there were others as well. These chants were all developed to support the regional liturgies used when celebrating the Mass there. Each area developed its own chants and rules for celebration. In Spain and Portugal, Mozarabic chant was used and shows the influence of North African music. The Mozarabic liturgy even survived through Muslim rule, though this was an isolated strand and this music was later suppressed in an attempt to enforce conformity on the entire liturgy. In Milan, Ambrosian chant, named after St. Ambrose, was the standard, while Beneventan chant developed around Benevento, another Italian liturgical center. Gallican chant was used in Gaul, and Celtic chant in Ireland and Great Britain.

Around 1011 AD, the Roman Catholic Church wanted to standardize the Mass and chant. At this time, Rome was the religious centre of western Europe, and Paris was the political centre. The standardization effort consisted mainly of combining these two (Roman and Gallican) regional liturgies. This body of chant became known as Gregorian Chant. By the 12th and 13th centuries, Gregorian chant had superseded all the other Western chant traditions, with the exception of the Ambrosian chant in Milan and the Mozarabic chant in a few specially designated Spanish chapels.

Instruments used to perform medieval music still exist, but in different forms. The flute was once made of wood rather than silver or other metal, and could be made as a side-blown or end-blown instrument. The recorder has more or less retained its past form. The gemshorn is similar to the recorder in having finger holes on its front, though it is actually a member of the ocarina family. One of the flute’s predecessors, the pan flute, was popular in mediaeval times, and is possibly of Hellenic origin. This instrument’s pipes were made of wood, and were graduated in length to produce different pitches.

Medieval music uses many plucked string instruments like the lute, mandore, gittern and psaltery. The dulcimers, similar in structure to the psaltery and zither, were originally plucked, but became struck in the 14th century after the arrival of the new technology that made metal strings possible.

The bowed lyra of the Byzantine Empire was the first recorded European bowed string instrument. The Persian geographer Ibn Khurradadhbih of the 9th century (d. 911) cited the Byzantine lyra, in his lexicographical discussion of instruments as a bowed instrument equivalent to the Arab rabāb and typical instrument of the Byzantines along with the urghun (organ), shilyani (probably a type of harp or lyre) and the salandj (probably a bagpipe). The hurdy-gurdy was (and still is) a mechanical violin using a rosined wooden wheel attached to a crank to “bow” its strings. Instruments without sound boxes like the jaw harp were also popular in the time. Early versions of the organ, fiddle (or vielle), and trombone (called the sackbut) existed.

DISCLAIMER:

All music and images belong to their rightful owners no copyright infringement intended.

Enjoy!!!

Modest Mouse / Dramamine

Modest Mouse / Dramamine

Traveling, swallowing, Dramamine
Feeling spaced breathing out Listerine
I’d said what I’d said that I’d tell you
And that you’d killed the better part of me

If you could just milk it for everything
I’ve said what I’d said and you know what I mean
But I still can’t focus on anything
We kiss on the mouth but still cough down our sleeves

Traveling, swallowing, Dramamine
Look at your face like you’re killed in a dream
And you think you’ve figured out everything
I think I know my geography pretty damn well

You say what you need so you’ll get more
If you could just milk it for everything
I’ve said what I said and you know what I mean
But I can’t still focus on anything

Songwriters
Jeremiah Green;Eric Scott Judy;Isaac Brock

Read more: Modest Mouse – Dramamine Lyrics | MetroLyrics

Modest Mouse / Ocean Breathes Salty

Modest Mouse / Ocean Breathes Salty

Your body may be gone, I’m gonna carry you in.
In my head, in my heart, in my soul.
And maybe we’ll get lucky and we’ll both live again.
Well I don’t know. I don’t know. I don’t really think so.

Well that is that and this is this.
You tell me what you want and I’ll tell you what you get.
You get away from me. You get away from me.
Collected my belongings and I left the jail.
Well thanks for the time, I needed to think a spell.
I had to think awhile. I had to think awhile.

The ocean breathes salty, won’t you carry it in?
In your head, in your mouth, in your soul.
And maybe we’ll get lucky and we’ll both grow old.
Well I don’t know. I don’t know. I don’t know. I hope so.

Well that is that and this is this.
You tell me what you want and I’ll tell you what you get.
You get away from me. You get away from me.
Collected my belongings and I left the jail.
Well thanks for the time, I needed to think a spell.
I had to think awhile. I had to think awhile.

Well that is that and this is this.
Will you tell me what you saw and I’ll tell you what you missed,
when the ocean met the sky.
You missed when time and life shook hands and said goodbye.
When the earth folded in on itself.
And said “Good luck, for your sake I hope heaven and hell
are really there, but I wouldn’t hold my breath.”
You wasted life, why wouldn’t you waste death?
You wasted life, why wouldn’t you waste death?

The ocean breathes salty, won’t you carry it in?
In your head, in your mouth, in your soul.
The more we move ahead the more we’re stuck in rewind.
Well I don’t mind. I don’t mind. How the hell could I mind?

Well that is that and this is this.
You tell me what you want and I’ll tell you what you get.
You get away from me. You get away from me.

Well that is that and this is this.
Will you tell me what you saw and I’ll tell you what you missed,
when the ocean met the sky.
You wasted life, why wouldn’t you waste the afterlife?

Atmosphere (music by Joy Division, cover by Trent Reznor and Peter Murphy)

An article in the December 3rd issue of The New York Times titled, Rewriting War, Japanese Right Attacks a Paper, by Martin Fackler, tells of a Japanese journalist, Takashi Uemura, his being targeted for taking a stand and a campaign of revisionist history abetted by a sitting Prime Minister. In the ’80’s and early nineties, Mr. Takashi Uemura wrote a series of articles in which a former soldier claimed to have been involved in the abduction of Korean women for use as sex slaves. The articles preceded, and no doubt contributed to, the Japanese government issuing an official apology in 1993, for the practice of organizing and pressing into service the so called “Comfort Women.”

The paper in which the articles appeared, The Asahi, retracted many of the articles as some were based on the testimony of a soldier who was later discredited. Though there is extensive testimony confirming the practice of luring, kidnapping and pressing into service the so called “Ianfu,” or prostitute. http://www.panos.co.uk/stories/2-13-1144-1650//Comfort-Women/#https://www.womenandwar.net/contents/home/home.nxhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comfort_women#Archives_by_Comfort_Women

The Asahi, a 135 year old paper and bastion of progressive perspective, has been singled out by the Japanese far-right calling for a boycott of the paper to put it out of business. Right wing Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has taken the campaign a step further to challenge the internationally recognized truth of Japan’s WWII practice of pressing Korean, and other foreign, women into white slavery.

This is significant for two reasons: first, both North and South Korea have had a history of tension with Japan, North Korea more dramatically so, as exemplified in their refusal to recognize Japan as a country; second, such campaigns to cleanse a nations history are a convenient tool to consolidate power by inciting a people to mass idiocy by pandering to their collective ego.

To tackle the second point first, spontaneous communities, or constituencies, can be conjured by creating a controversy and championing a side. Now, in the realm of politics, if such a controversial issue, at best, has no real bearing on the health of a societies culture and maintenance then suspicion should fall on those taking up the issue. The logic goes like this, at any given moment there are issues that require the attention of those entrusted to govern, such as: economic health, justice, services, foreign relations, etc,. A worthy administrator should be able to acknowledge which issues are of greatest priority to the health of the society and have an idea on how to address the issue. If, on the other hand, a candidate or sitting politician chooses to take up an issue which merely caters to the vanity of his constituency, he not only garners his power with no stated obligation to the administration of the government or his office, but he gains an [unreasonable] support. When you have a constituency that is deliberately unreasonable, they have given up the idea that we all have an obligation to the greater society. Instead, they forge a community which deliberately isolates itself not for the sake of truth but power–to have power through simple agreement amongst themselves.

Which brings us to the first point. To acknowledge a wrong to a former enemy or neighbor is an act of good faith which implies a desire for improved relations. To deny such a wrong is a declaration that one does not care about the committing of that wrong and implies that no such good faith or improved relations are desired–further, that to lie about a crime committed once implies that one would lie about it again, that one is capable of committing the same offence once again. Also, by taking an aggressive stand against a former enemy or neighbor through the denial of past offence, one sets oneself in opposition to that neighbor, making him an enemy. In unjustly creating an enemy, those within the community who would champion truth and take up the cause of the wronged neighbor can they themselves now be called out as being in the same camp as “the enemy” by the community bound by the “unreasonable” assertion. It is that same impetus to garner power by creating an isolated community not  hobbled by any obligation to anyone but themselves. If given free reign, such patterns can only lead to war.

Meanwhile, the leaders who amass power in such ways… well, if they must resort to chicanery to gain office, rather than a clear statement of pertinant concerns and strategies, their interest in gaining office is suspect and must be predicated upon some other agenda which is not in the interest of the society. If their priority is not in managing the resources of the society in a reasoned and responsible way, then their agenda is corrupt.

The same pattern can be seen in Greece right now. Greek politicians have gotten themselves elected condemning the country of FYROM for calling themselves Macedonia–hence the moniker, the Former Republic of Macedonia. Who cares what a neighboring country chooses to call itself?! Well, if not all, nearly all Greeks, that’s who. The Greeks say that, historically, Macedonia only partially extended into this former Yugoslavian region and that these southern Slavs are stealing their heritage. This has increased isolation between the borders of these two countries. The kind of isolation which only benefits a small group of its citizens at the expense of everybody else. Thessaloniki suffers from the lack of trade and travel which would otherwise flourish but for this ratcheting tension between these two nations.

When I was in grade-school on the playground  there were kids who loved to instigate fights between others when they saw the opportunity to inflame or even create a dispute–some of us would call them out as “instigators.” I suppose it would be paranoid to suggest that such games are played on an international level–or would it be? The one who gains is the one who can play on both sides of the dispute and the ones who lead the factions who champion the polarizing sentiments.

This is important for the US, not only because we can only lose if the world slides into greater and greater instability, but also because we are by no means immune from these very same corrupting agendas. Recently, the US Senate released a report on US use of torture. This could open the way for hearings and, eventually, lawsuits. There has also been speculation that the release of this information could spur acts of revenge from extremists. (I won’t even bother to quote the idiotic comment of a former US president as the logic is beneath response.) But it should suffice to say, that it is proof of our capacity for responsible governance that these reports have been released; it is proof that there are those in our system who still believe in good faith negotiation; it is important not only to set an example to other nations, but to give ourselves a standard by which we may, ourselves, be judged–to draw, properly, the negative attention to not only the wrong actions for which we are culpable, but also to those actors who would put forward such actions in our name.